Thursday, February 26, 2015

The Ultimate Dark Chocolate Coconut Fudge Recipe

Fudge is one of those treats most often seen at touristy shops, candy stores and ice cream shops during the summer season. It can also be found at the grocery store for those times when you get a sudden craving for the smooth, sweet stuff.

I always preferred the slightly crisp fudge made by my mother's friend, which turned up on our doorstep each year on my mother's birthday (which I usually ate most of). Someday I will get the recipe for that fudge. However, today I am sharing a new personal favourite fudge recipe: Dark Chocolate Coconut Fudge.

I often make an attempt at buying the store-bought fudge. But nearly every time, I find myself putting the fudge back on the shelf before I leave the store. Why?  Ingredients.

In addition to the insane amount of icing sugar added to most store-bought fudge recipes and artificial vanilla flavouring, there is one ingredient that I will not tolerate in my food: hydrogenated vegetable oil. Whether it is partially hydrogenated or fully hydrogenated, or cottonseed, soybean, palm or kernel, I don't want it. The process that the oil has gone through results in a thicker oil that makes it harder for our hearts to pump blood through our systems (ref). It increases our LDL (bad cholesterol) and decreases our HDL (good cholesterol) (ref). So until food (and fudge) manufacturers get the picture and take it out, I will make my own fudge from scratch.

This recipe has all the deliciousness of a dark chocolate fudge with a nice fun crunch, but is much more natural than the store-bought stuff from touristy ice cream shops. Sure, there is some fat in it, but just try to remember that portion control is important.  This fudge freezes well, so you can cut it into pieces, seal in plastic wrap and freeze them individually. Thaw and enjoy a piece every day!

Recipe: Dark Chocolate Coconut Fudge with a Crunch

Make 12 large pieces (43g/1.5oz each), or 24 small pieces (22g/.75oz each).

You need:

  • For the fudge:
  • 3.5 oz (100g) coconut oil
  • 12 oz (340g)  of 70% dark chocolate, chopped
  • 1/2 cup (50g or 118 ml in a measuring cup) coconut sugar (you can use regular sugar, if you like)
  • 1 cup (30g or 237 ml in a measuring cup) of crisped rice cereal (I used the brown rice kind), or chopped, roasted almonds if you prefer
  • The scraping of 1 vanilla bean or 1/4 tsp of ground vanilla bean (not the liquid extract) - optional

For the topping:
  • 1/4 cup (25g) of unsweetened medium coconut flakes (again, use sweetened if you like)
  • 2 oz (57g) of dark or semi-sweet chocolate shaved, or finely chopped

Instructions:

1. Line a loaf pan (about 9" x 5") with plastic wrap (see below for tips on other pans that you can use) and set the pan aside.

2. Place 10 ounces of your chopped chocolate in a medium stainless steel bowl (for a double boiler) or a glass or plastic mixing bowl (for the microwave). Reserve 2 ounces and set aside.

3. Melt the chocolate in one of two ways:

a) Over a double boiler (place your chocolate bowl over 1" of nearly simmering water in a small pot of water). Stir the chocolate with a dry wooden spoon.  Ensure that no water gets in the chocolate, not even a drop and that your tools are dry before you start. Stir until melted to a temperature of 120 degrees Fahrenheit.

or

b) Melt the chocolate in the microwave for 2 minutes on half power (in glass, ceramic or plastic bowl only). Remove, stir with a wooden spoon and then microwave for 5 to 10 second intervals until entirely melted to a temperature of 120 degrees Fahrenheit.


4. While the chocolate is melting, place your coconut oil into a microwave-safe dish and microwave for 40 seconds, just until melted.  Remove and add the sugar to the coconut oil and stir until mixed. Tip: for a smoother fudge you can whirl the melted coconut oil and coconut sugar in a single-serving blender (I used the Ninja smoothie attachment, but the Magic Bullet would work, or a an immersion blender). Set aside.

5. Once your chocolate is 120 degrees F, you need to temper it. The simplest method is to remove it from the heat and immediately toss in the 2 ounces of chopped chocolate that you had reserved. Stir until smooth. Continue to reduce the temperature further by either placing over a bowl of ice water (or stirring the bowl of chocolate while it rests on the shelf inside your fridge - but this takes longer). Cool to about 82 to 86 degrees.

6. Add your coconut oil and coconut sugar to the chocolate. With a spatula, stir the chocolate mixture over the ice bath again until you reduce the temperature further, to a few degrees above room temperature or just as you notice it thicken. Work quickly and add the crisped rice cereal, and then immediately pour into your pan and spread out quickly.

7. Sprinkle the coconut topping over the fudge and gently press into the fudge so it sticks.


8. Place the fudge in the refrigerator for 1/2 hour to set. Remove from the fridge and gently remove from the pan by holding the sides of the plastic wrap to lift up and out onto a cutting board. Cut into 12 large square pieces or 24 small pieces.


Pan Tips: If you do not want to use a loaf pan, or simply want to get more creative with your fudge shape, you can line a box lid if you do not have one, or use a round cake pan.  I made this recipe once in the Simply Baked disposable paper baking pans and gave it as a gift to someone. If you pour the fudge a few minutes earlier (i.e. before it thickens) you can also pour it directly into cupcake papers.

Don't want to temper chocolate or don't have a digital thermometer?  Try the Coconut Fudge recipe that I reviewed yesterday! It is silky smooth, but just be sure to check my tips and tricks for making it easier to handle. Find the review and link to the recipe here: http://ultimatechocolateblog.blogspot.ca/2015/02/coconut-fudge-recipe-good-recipe.html.

1 comment:

  1. Wow such a yummy chocolate fudge..Going to try it today only and As i'm new in your blog and i find lot's of yummy recipe and i need to try all dish..
    Simple fudge

    ReplyDelete